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Can you get an associates at a community college, then get your bachelors at a 4yr school?

Topic: Academics | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 06/17/2010

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Yes! In fact, many community colleges are partnered with four-year schools, making it easy to transfer credits. This means that you can get an associates at a community college, then only need to spend two more years to get your bachelors. This can be a great option if you're worried about money.

Answered by: Laura46 I. | over 4 years ago
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The answer to this question is absolutely yes. In fact, community colleges are traditionally set up for just such articulation. Many four year institutions of higher education even have specifically designed programs to allow students to seamlessly move from a community college to their bachelor's program. Not only is this possible, it is often an excellent idea. Consider that community colleges are full of teachers whereas four year institutions of higher education often demand research from their faculty. Faculty members fully dedicated to teaching, such as in a community college, are probably going to better serve students fresh out of high school.

Answered by: Cdbuloc X. | over 4 years ago
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It is possible to take your first two years of school at a community college and then transfer those credits to a 4-year university. You can get your associates with transferable credits and then wait to go for your bachelors, or you can immediately go to a university for your bachelors after finishing your first two community college years. It's very flexible.

Answered by: Iamerica N. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, I have known a number of people who have done this. They have gotten their basics out of the way and then transferred. One thing to check though is what course will transfer to your 4 year school? Also, make sure that if you can get an associates degree that you really need a BA, some jobs don't require them and not everyone needs a 4 year degree. For instance, my brother has a two year degree in computers and the company he is working for is now paying for him to go back to school and complete his 4 year degree. So that could work out as well.

Answered by: Wizard Q. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. It is a very smart idea to do that and i highly advise it.

Answered by: Dwood955 Yahoo.Com E. | over 4 years ago
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Definately! This is a route that many people take, especially if they need to work full time. This is also a good option when you need to get your grades higher and expand your activities. Make sure you work closely with a counselor at the community college you attend, as you will need to make sure your classes are transferable. Many 4 year schools have different requirements for transfer students. Good luck!

Answered by: Working Girl T. | over 4 years ago
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Actually yes you can. It is the road my sister took and it is cost effective and gives you the smaller class sizes of high school for 2 years of college. Then the exciting atmosphere and class sizes of a University for the next 2 years. It is something I recommend.

Answered by: Skipper Dave N. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. You can get an Associates degree first, or you can get a year or two of general education credits and transfer to a four year institution. Students who graduated from high school with lower GPAs or who are undecided about whether to get a bachelors degree may prefer to start at a community college. It is always best to check the transfer policies of the universities you are considering for transfer before taking community college classes as universities may limit the number of transfer hours or the types of credits that may be transferred.

Answered by: Zolty F. | over 4 years ago
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The main purpose of a community college is to help you attain an associates degree. After that, most 4 year schools have agreements with community colleges that honor the associate degree you can get at a community college, thereby allowing you to work towards and earn a bachelors.

Answered by: Beentheredonedat J. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. There are actually a lot of students that do this for financial reasons. If you decide to enroll at a community college to pursue your Associates, be sure that the courses you have taken will transfer to the college or university that you choose for your Bachelor's. This will eliminate the possibility of you having to retake classes you already took at the community college because they did not transfer.

Answered by: Collegechick B. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you certainly can. Be sure to read the community college information about how easily their credits transfer to a college. Some do and some don't. State schools should accept credits from state community colleges. Many students do a transfer program with the intention of going to a 4 year school after community college. But you can also get an associates degree in a skill then go on to a 4 year school. Lots of times your employer will actually pay for the further schooling.

Answered by: Anonymous J. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, you can get an associates at a community college and then move to get your bachelors in a 4 year school. Some of the work you did in community college will transfer to the 4 year school. But you will still have to fulfill the requirements of the 4 year school. If you plan well then you may graduate within 4 years with transfer credit. But you may have to stay an extra semester if you don't.

Answered by: Anonymous I. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, you can. It's actually a somewhat common educational path. If you're planning on doing this, it's best to map out in advance which community college and four-year university you plan to attend, and check out their credit transfer policy in advance. There's nothing worse than completing your community college degree and finding out that half your credits don't transfer.

Answered by: Null Terminator N. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, you could get your associates in a vocation that is in demand, allows you to continue your education and pays well. Then while working on your BA, you can work enough to support yourself. Or you can just go to a community college for 2 years to cheaply get the general education requirements out of the way, and then transfer to a 4 year school. Both are smart choices!

Answered by: Junior Sweet P. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. Many people do it this way. Take nursing as an example. You start out at a community college and get your associate nursing degree. This allows you to enter the work place and start making money as soon as possible. Then once you are ready, you can then enter the 4 year college and start work on your BS degree (usually takes another couple of years).

Answered by: Dantheman50 L. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, you can, though you may run into trouble getting your classes to transfer. This can be a good option if you're not sure if you want a bachelor's degree. However, if you know you want to pursue a four year degree, then it's usually best to just go to a four year school to start with, if you can, so you don't have to deal with differing major requirements. If this is not an option for you, then get in touch with an adviser, and plan to take courses which will transfer to most four year universities whenever possible.

Answered by: Wennifred K. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. Community college is where most people end up going to do just that. A community college is actually a 2 year school and normally an associates is the highest you can graduate with. You can then transfer to a 4 year school to continue on to get your bachelors.

Answered by: Jen B. | over 4 years ago
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Absolutely! Taking a lot of classes at a community college can save you tons of money! However, before you start, make sure that the community college credits will transfer to the 4yr school of your choice AND to your specific degree. Sometimes these credits are applied as electives, which does very little to advance your degree. If the 4 yr college confirms that the class will transfer when you call, ask for an email confirmation as well so that you have the answer in writing. This will save you a hassle if later on, the college refuses to correctly apply your community college credits.

Answered by: Jenna367 K. | over 4 years ago
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Many people take this exact route. You can take all of your core courses for a cheap rate. It is important to transfer to a school that will accept most of your credits from community college, otherwise you will end up having to retake some. You may also enjoy other benefits of going to a college close to home, such as living at home rent free. Many high school guidance councilors even recommend getting an associates first.

Answered by: Boytoy12 T. | over 4 years ago
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It's a great way. At a community college, you can get your "general" classes like history and math out of the way. Just make sure the credits will transfer to the school you plan on applying to later. You'll save money at a community college, too. Then, when you go to the four year school, you have time to really take classes pertinent to your are of study.

Answered by: Syam V. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. This is generally the course people take when they attend community college. You can usually finish up an associate___s degree in 2 years if you are going to school full time. When you enter a 4 year university you usually enter as a junior but if a lot of your credit did not transfer or if you changed your major then you might be at sophomore level. Contact an academic counselor at your community college for more information on the process.

Answered by: Jessica Al22 D. | over 4 years ago
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It generally depends on your area of study, but that's a great way to do it. Community Colleges are so much cheaper, so getting the basics out of the way there is a good idea. You'll just have to be careful about transfer credit - make sure you don't end up taking too many classes that won't count towards your degree at the four year school.

Answered by: Syam V. | over 4 years ago
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Frequently, yes, but make sure you check with the 4-year school first to make sure your credits will transfer. Depending on your schools and degree program, you may not be able to spend two years at the community college, but you can usually take many of your "core" classes there and transfer them.

Answered by: Owlgrad1998 I. | over 4 years ago
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It depends on if the credits transfer or not. Usually, at least some of your credits will transfer, and you will be able to continue your studies at a four year university.

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, I have known a number of people who have done this. They have gotten their basics out of the way and then transferred. One thing to check though is what course will transfer to your 4 year school? Also, make sure that if you can get an associates degree that you really need a BA, some jobs don't require them and not everyone needs a 4 year degree. For instance, my brother has a two year degree in computers and the company he is working for is now paying for him to go back to school and complete his 4 year degree. So that could work out as well.

Answered by: Wizard Q. | over 4 years ago
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Each individual university has their own policies regarding transfer credits. Some four year universities are built on a system that awards an associates degree to students after two years of study, and allows them to further their studies for two more years t secure their bachelor's degree. The associates degree itself may not transfer for credit in other university systems, but the coursework completed to secure the degree often will. Contacting the admissions department of your university is often the best way to find out which credits will and won't transfer.

Answered by: Adamkendallz V. | over 4 years ago
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Yes! In fact, many community colleges are partnered with four-year schools, making it easy to transfer credits. This means that you can get an associates at a community college, then only need to spend two more years to get your bachelors. This can be a great option if you're worried about money.

Answered by: Laura46 I. | over 4 years ago
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Some schools will directly transfer you to the school of the state. For example one of my friends went to Montgomery College (MD) for two years and got her associates in nursing and then finished and got her bachelors in Maryland University. Directly transferred so none of her credits went missing. So you can get an associates at a community college. Don't worry regarding it.

Answered by: Hi123. L. | over 4 years ago
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Yes. This is generally the course people take when they attend community college. You can usually finish up an associate___s degree in 2 years if you are going to school full time. When you enter a 4 year university you usually enter as a junior but if a lot of your credit did not transfer or if you changed your major then you might be at sophomore level. Contact an academic counselor at your community college for more information on the process.

Answered by: Jessica Al22 D. | over 4 years ago
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It generally depends on your area of study, but that's a great way to do it. Community Colleges are so much cheaper, so getting the basics out of the way there is a good idea. You'll just have to be careful about transfer credit - make sure you don't end up taking too many classes that won't count towards your degree at the four year school.

Answered by: Syam V. | over 4 years ago
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Frequently, yes, but make sure you check with the 4-year school first to make sure your credits will transfer. Depending on your schools and degree program, you may not be able to spend two years at the community college, but you can usually take many of your "core" classes there and transfer them.

Answered by: Owlgrad1998 I. | over 4 years ago
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It depends on if the credits transfer or not. Usually, at least some of your credits will transfer, and you will be able to continue your studies at a four year university.

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | over 4 years ago
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Each individual university has their own policies regarding transfer credits. Some four year universities are built on a system that awards an associates degree to students after two years of study, and allows them to further their studies for two more years t secure their bachelor's degree. The associates degree itself may not transfer for credit in other university systems, but the coursework completed to secure the degree often will. Contacting the admissions department of your university is often the best way to find out which credits will and won't transfer.

Answered by: Adamkendallz V. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you certainly can. Be sure to read the community college information about how easily their credits transfer to a college. Some do and some don't. State schools should accept credits from state community colleges. Many students do a transfer program with the intention of going to a 4 year school after community college. But you can also get an associates degree in a skill then go on to a 4 year school. Lots of times your employer will actually pay for the further schooling.

Answered by: Anonymous J. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, but you need to make sure that the classes that you took or are taking at the community college will transfer to the college where you will be attending for your bachelors. Not all schools will accept credits from others so research carefully before starting your associates at a particular college. Also make sure that all programs will be recognized by your state if accredidation is needed.

Answered by: Indy Disney Fan F. | over 4 years ago
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You certainly can. Just apply for a bachelors at a 4 year school and make sure to follow the application requirements. You probably do not need to go through 4 years to get a bachelors after already having an associates because some of your previous class credits will be able to transfer.

Answered by: Nycpigeons Q. | over 4 years ago
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Yes, many students plan to attend a two year community college first, to obtain an associates degree, and then transfer to a four year school after. Your academic advisor at the community college can help you select the best classes for this process and help you follow through on your goals to transfer to a four year school.

Answered by: Mighty Spidey L. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you can obtain an Associates Degree from a community college then move on to a four year school to get your Bachelor Degree. You need to first decide what four year institution you want to attend to be sure the credits you take at the community college will transfer. If you are unsure of what four year college you want to transfer to talk to your advisors at the community college to make sure you are taking classes that will transfer to most institutions. They have a pretty good idea of what will and what will not transfer.

Answered by: Njc2218 O. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you can; in fact, this route can be a great way to save money. Try to attend a community college that has a matriculation agreement with one of your state's universities; oftentimes these agreements state that you will be automatically accepted to the state university as long as you graduate from community college with at least a certain GPA. Also, make sure to carefully check as you register for classes at your community college that they will transfer to your intended four year school. You wouldn't want to spend money taking classes at community college and then have to pay to retake them at the university because the university won't accept those transfer credits.

Answered by: Mem4dr A. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you can! You can attend a community college for 2 years and get your associates. Afterwards, you can transfer over to a university to get your bachelors. Some people even get their bachelors online.

Answered by: Mcw2004 Y. | over 4 years ago
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Yes you can get your assoicates degree at a community college and then get your bachelors at a four year school. You apply to attend the four year school after you have finished your associates at the community college. Just check with the school that you are wanting to transfer to, to be sure that all your community college classes will transfer to the university. Going to community college is a great way to save money on your college education.

Answered by: Turker Y. | over 4 years ago
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Some schools will directly transfer you to the school of the state. For example one of my friends went to Montgomery College (MD) for two years and got her associates in nursing and then finished and got her bachelors in Maryland University. Directly transferred so none of her credits went missing. So you can get an associates at a community college. Don't worry regarding it.

Answered by: Hi123. L. | over 4 years ago
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