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I did my first internship last year (my spring semester of Juniro year) and it made me realize that I do not want to go into that field. But, I'm going to be a senior now and it's pretty much too late to change majors. What should I do?

Topic: Admissions | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 07/02/2010

Answers (36)

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It's never too late to change a major. If you find that the field you are currently going into just is not for you, it's not too late to change majors. You have to ask yourself, is this something I can see myself doing for the rest of my life. If it truly isn't, the couple of years more you'll have to spend on obtaining a different degree would be time well spent. I would highly recommend finishing the degree though and trying to get a job in your current field. If you still find that it's not for you, you can continue to go to school while you are (I'm going out on a limb a little bit here) making much more money than you currently are. Many organizations also have tuition assistance, so you could use that benefit to retrain yourself in another field.

Answered by: Ashelton N. | about 4 years ago
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It's never too late to change your major. Many of your classes can be transferred over to your new major. However, you will likely have to extend your college stay. You may want to just bite the bullet and finish your degree, and then find a job in the field you do want to work in. Many people find jobs in fields unrelated to their major. Ask your college advisors for advice. That's what they are their for, and the have seen this kind of question many times.

Answered by: Criterion Y. | about 4 years ago
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When deciding on a college major you should choose something that is both marketable and of interest to you. A good way to begin this process is to take a standard career test; many of them are free online. Once you take the test, which will give you some suggestions based on your personality and interests, take your results and compare them to job outlooks. To get the most up to date information on job outlooks (and always look for a 5-10 year outlook) go to the U.S. Department of Labor. They will list not only the outlooks, but also the various pay rates for those jobs. You may be surprised how many careers you may be able to establish with your college degree, which have great relation to your interests. Remember, idealism is key to advancement in the world, but you must also be practical. There will be a slim percentile of careers that utilize all your skills and enhance all your interest. Remember, look to where the world economy and technology will be taking us in the next decade, and factor that into any college major, and future career choice.

Answered by: Sanityrose T. | about 4 years ago
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This is why I always say it's good to do internships. First I would suggest figuring out what other fields you major can be applied to. There are usually many different job opportunities available for a specific major. Also, most college graduates are working in a job that doesn't even relate to their major. Don't despair! If you have taken a lot of classes in another field of interest you may consider picking up a minor in a new field to make yourself marketable in that field. If you have enough classes to perhaps double major it might be good to take classes during summer and winter sessions to finish up a new major. Staying on another year is also a possibility to consider.

Answered by: Keepsmiling F. | about 4 years ago
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If the field is not in the hard sciences, then often you can make a transition into the field even if your major is not directly related. You might have to start at lower pay than someone who majored in the field and has experience in it, but you can definitely work your way up with an unrelated college degree. If the field you want to enter is in the hard sciences, then you are going to have to go back and take the supplementary classes necessary to get a degree in the particular science. Before deciding to commit to more schooling, go to work for a couple of years after college - even if the work is not in your desired field. It will help you to earn some money and confirm whether you really want to switch fields.

Answered by: Mem4dr A. | about 4 years ago
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Choosing a major is hard for any young person. Maybe stick with that major for one more year. Because you are already 3 years into it. So to drop it and start new? 5 more years of college? If you really want to change maybe go to a trade school. Maybe start your own business .

Answered by: The Professor N. | about 4 years ago
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You could always consider staying in school a year longer if you could afford it.

Answered by: Advizor T. | about 4 years ago
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It's never too late to change majors! Never ever! Unless you have a very specific timetable set up for your entire life (most of us never have such a thing) there is no reason you can't pursue your new ambition. While it may seem like it's too late now, imagine yourself 25 years down the road after you've been working in a job you hated for the last quarter century, and wishing you'd have spent the extra year or two to pursue something you love. It's never too late! Follow your calling - every college advisor will tell you the same.

Answered by: Mixtape C. | about 4 years ago
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You need to ask yourself what you really want and then go for it. While it may cost you more money to change majors and cause you to be in school longer, the result will be well worth it. You will be able to apply for jobs that really make you happy, instead of choosing a career that you hate. Fortunately, most colleges and universities have general education courses that everyone must take, regardless of their major, so you more than likely have all your basics out of the way. Talk with your advisers about the best plan for you to get on track with a new major, and have them nail down a definite time-line and course schedule with you so that you can begin working on your goal. If you haven't chosen a new major yet, spend some time doing research about fields that interest you, and try taking personality/career competency exams for free at your school's career center. There are counselors there to help you, so take advantage of them!

Answered by: Sberrywoman16 Y. | about 4 years ago
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Two options that I can think of: 1. Finish school and either: A. Hate your job and life B. Find a different career that you would like to do and work from the bottom up in the company. 2. Change majors and go to school for anotehr 2-4 years. Personally I would change majors. If you do not enjoy your job, you will not enjoy your life.

Answered by: Nb07 Y. | about 4 years ago
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Although you may think it is to late, you should truly consider the impact of sticking to a major you do not enjoy. This could possibly cause a series of events which lead you to get a job you don't like, quit that job, and end up taking classes when you are older to go in a different direction. You must decide if time and money is more important to you than happiness.

Answered by: Jpeltz Q. | about 4 years ago
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Surprisingly, a lot of people do not go into the job field of their major. You can apply for other jobs as well as long as they don't need a specified degree such as a doctor. You can always study extra classes at a community college.

Answered by: Choco Mint Y. | about 4 years ago
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You could go to a vocational school in a field that you actually want to attend. You could also get a master's degree in the field that you want to go into. If the field you want to go into is close you could just see if you can get a job w/ your current major.

Answered by: Zolty F. | about 4 years ago
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I would go talk to your adviser and see if there are any other majors similar to what you are currently enrolled in. If you have stayed in the major this long then you must enjoy some element of it. You may find something within the department that uses the same skills but in a different way. It may cause you to take longer to graduate but it is better then taking a job for the rest of your life that you will not enjoy.

Answered by: College Student123 T. | about 4 years ago
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One way to fix this problem is switch your major immediately. You will have to take an extra year or so to accomplish a new major, but it's better than not being happy with your career for the rest of your life.

Answered by: Tbowser Y. | about 4 years ago
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I actually did change my major my senior year, but it was to a major that was somewhat related so I was still able to graduate on time. I did have to take a lot of harder classes that year, and more than the normal number of credits each quarter, but it was worth it to me in the end. If this is not an option for you, then you need to decide how specialized your current major is and if it will prevent you from pursuing something else in the future. Then decide whether taking an extra couple quarters of school will be worth it to change your future employment options. Don't forget summer school!

Answered by: Wennifred K. | about 4 years ago
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You have two options: you could change your major or continue with your current major. Changing your major may not be as hard as you think. If you choose a major close to your own, most or all of your classes will still count and it will be very easy (example: changing from English to Literature). Talk to your counselor and he/she will let you know what your options are for other majors. Or you can keep the your current major. Understand that you have already gone through three years of schooling and it was only the internship which made you change your mind. That means your dislike is not for the subject, but for the job. However, it is important to understand that different employers will treat/assign things differently to their employees. It could be that particular employer and that particular job did not suit your taste. It does not mean that your major is at all incorrect, it simply means you must find a workplace which suits you, as everyone must do.

Answered by: Mayell U. | about 4 years ago
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I would finish up your current major and get that degree. After you finish that major you can get a job with that degree. Once you have a job you can go back to college for what you want to do. This is not uncommon lots of people change their mind about what they want to do, it's a huge decision. If you get a job first you will be able to pay for more schooling.

Answered by: Jwicklund07 L. | about 4 years ago
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It's never too late to change majors. Chances are that you have enough classes in your minor that you can count towards a different major. I did the same thing. I was a senior and had 4 classes to go to finish my major. It ended up that I only had five classes to go with from my minor to get a degree. Talk to your advisor and see what they say!

Answered by: Boylen33 D. | about 4 years ago
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A lot of times, whatever your degree is is not actually the job field you get into. You should finish your degree first. Then apply for any jobs that you are interested in whether it's related or unrelated to your field. Work and take classes that's related in the field you want to switch it at a local college or something. Then, once you get your degree, you can fully switch into the job field you want to get into.

Answered by: Sea Whale H. | about 4 years ago
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Research other careers in your field of study that are different than what you interned in. For example, if studying criminal justice and you find you don't like police work, find out if you can be a counselor or paralegal. If you are studying medicine but don't like sick people, research pharmacy assisting or medical records management.

Answered by: Tbw R. | about 4 years ago
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While you may feel as though your past four years of education were fruitless, the fact that you will be receiving a Degree is most important. It is good that you have found out what you are not interested in for your field of study and that you may want to go in a different direction. Many times it does not matter what you majored in during your time in college, as long as you at least have a Bachelors. If you are passionate and qualified for a position outside of your field, your major will generally not matter.

Answered by: Jimm34 Z. | about 4 years ago
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If you enjoy the major, you could have just had a bad experience in your internship. You can also branch out in other related fields like teaching the subject if that's a consideration. If you decided that you just don't like the major anymore, talk to your counselor and ask how to change majors this late. It's going to add another couple of years but if the college will allow changing that late, it's a possibility.

Answered by: Dream Scaper X. | about 4 years ago
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Please find whether there is the way to get into a field which you prefer the best. I think that you can change the group if you are the topper in junior level please make sure about it.

Answered by: Qwezxc A. | about 4 years ago
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If you are no longer interested in the major you can talk to your academic adviser which they can make recommendations on what classes you will need to take in order to complete a new major. Any additional classes that you take will occur more charges. I would also talk to a career specialist since they can tell you what other options you have with your major that you choose.

Answered by: All Incorp O. | about 4 years ago
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You should probably just stick with your major. If you plan on doing graduate school, then do that in the field that you want. You only have one year left. Having a degree in a field you don't like is better than restarting now. Consider going for a couple more years for graduate work. Many people do graduate work in unrelated fields.

Answered by: Allgrowdup O. | about 4 years ago
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You can always stay in school for another year or two to finish off a different major. You can try to see if there are any other majors available that you are interested in that would allow you to transfer classes from your current major.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
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If you are already in your senior year, it might be best to graduate with the degree you are going for, and then start fresh. If you have already taken classes which apply to what you want to change your major to, then by all means, go ahead and change your path. It is not unheard of to do so, and is actually quite common.

Answered by: Molae06 Q. | about 4 years ago
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Research other careers in your field of study that are different than what you interned in. For example, if studying criminal justice and you find you don't like police work, find out if you can be a counselor or paralegal. If you are studying medicine but don't like sick people, research pharmacy assisting or medical records management.

Answered by: Tbw R. | about 4 years ago
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While you may feel as though your past four years of education were fruitless, the fact that you will be receiving a Degree is most important. It is good that you have found out what you are not interested in for your field of study and that you may want to go in a different direction. Many times it does not matter what you majored in during your time in college, as long as you at least have a Bachelors. If you are passionate and qualified for a position outside of your field, your major will generally not matter.

Answered by: Jimm34 Z. | about 4 years ago
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If you enjoy the major, you could have just had a bad experience in your internship. You can also branch out in other related fields like teaching the subject if that's a consideration. If you decided that you just don't like the major anymore, talk to your counselor and ask how to change majors this late. It's going to add another couple of years but if the college will allow changing that late, it's a possibility.

Answered by: Dream Scaper X. | about 4 years ago
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Please find whether there is the way to get into a field which you prefer the best. I think that you can change the group if you are the topper in junior level please make sure about it.

Answered by: Qwezxc A. | about 4 years ago
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If you are no longer interested in the major you can talk to your academic adviser which they can make recommendations on what classes you will need to take in order to complete a new major. Any additional classes that you take will occur more charges. I would also talk to a career specialist since they can tell you what other options you have with your major that you choose.

Answered by: All Incorp O. | about 4 years ago
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You should probably just stick with your major. If you plan on doing graduate school, then do that in the field that you want. You only have one year left. Having a degree in a field you don't like is better than restarting now. Consider going for a couple more years for graduate work. Many people do graduate work in unrelated fields.

Answered by: Allgrowdup O. | about 4 years ago
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You can always stay in school for another year or two to finish off a different major. You can try to see if there are any other majors available that you are interested in that would allow you to transfer classes from your current major.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
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If you are already in your senior year, it might be best to graduate with the degree you are going for, and then start fresh. If you have already taken classes which apply to what you want to change your major to, then by all means, go ahead and change your path. It is not unheard of to do so, and is actually quite common.

Answered by: Molae06 Q. | about 4 years ago
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