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is it better to attend a community college first and then be transferred to a university?

Topic: Admissions | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 06/17/2010

Answers (38)

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By going to a community college first, you save THOUSANDS of dollars. It is also a great choice if you just want to get your foot in the water in college. A four year college may be too overwhelming and a community college is a better way to start.

Answered by: Choco Mint Y. | about 4 years ago
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It depends on your goals. Attending community college first can be a great way to save money and adjust to the more rigorous academic life of college. However, if you want to go to grad school, such as medical school, those schools usually prefer that you take all the required science classes at a 4-year institution, not a community college. So, if you plan to go to medical school or pursue graduate studies in the sciences, then it would be best to spend all four years at a university.

Answered by: Mem4dr A. | about 4 years ago
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If you are not sure if you are ready for the full college lifestyle, or you do not have the money to pay for college without taking a large amount for a loan, then I would recommend attending community college. Community college is cheaper alternative to get the classes that you need without the having a large financial burden. Community college also gives you a good feel on college life without having to leave far away from your family.

Answered by: All Incorp O. | about 4 years ago
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Going straight to university and going the community college route are both equally good options. Going to community college first has many advantages; you save money for the first year or two of college (during which you wouldn't really be taking classes for your major anyway), you can get into more universities than you could straight out of high school, and you get some time to decide what you want to do.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
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If you are not sure if you are ready for the full college lifestyle, or you do not have the money to pay for college without taking a large amount for a loan, then I would recommend attending community college. Community college is cheaper alternative to get the classes that you need without the having a large financial burden. Community college also gives you a good feel on college life without having to leave far away from your family.

Answered by: All Incorp O. | about 4 years ago
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One of the greatest benefits of community college is the cost. Two years of community college cost as much (or less) as one year of a university. A high GPA at a community college can also qualify you for scholarships and offset a lower GPA in high school.

Answered by: Tbw R. | about 4 years ago
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This depends on your reasons for doing so. If finances are an issue, I would say taking the first year of courses at a cheaper community college is advisable. However, be sure that the courses you take at the community college will transfer to the university! If finances are not the reason, jump into that university experience head on!

Answered by: Collegechick B. | about 4 years ago
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Yes, it is much better to go to a community college or two-year institution and then transfer to a four-year. One reason is because a community college gives you the same education for much cheaper. One year at a community college is 1200, while one year at a four-year is 25,000-50,000+. Also, the classes are much smaller and teachers are more available to help students. Another reason is that if you are undecided on your major, you won't be wasting hundreds of dollars taking useless classes at a four-year and will only be wasting around 70 at a two year. Note that most students change their major 2-3 times. Also, most students pay for those expensive four-year colleges with student loans with add interest while they are in school. 12,000 dollars can turn into 17,000 by the time they are out. Meanwhile, a community college is so cheap, yet still have aid available, that students hardly ever need any kind of loan. Lastly, taking classes at a community college will show four-year colleges how you reacted to college life and the intensity of college courses and it will give you a better chance of being accepted into more prestigious colleges than if you applied right after high school. However, just make sure your classes will transfer to most schools. For this, you must do your own research as schools tend to lie. If the college is a community, state-owned one, there is no need to worry.

Answered by: Mayell U. | about 4 years ago
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It really depends on your personality. If you don't think that you'll be able to manage yourself and coursework during the freshman year, then you should go to a community college. Additionally, if you do not think that you'll be successful at a larger university, then you should probably start out at a community college. If you are sure of what you want to major in and are comfortable with going off to a university, then you should probably go to the university.

Answered by: Rx Josh I. | about 4 years ago
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One of the greatest benefits of community college is the cost. Two years of community college cost as much (or less) as one year of a university. A high GPA at a community college can also qualify you for scholarships and offset a lower GPA in high school.

Answered by: Tbw R. | about 4 years ago
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It's a great way to get used to college life. It's also usually a much cheaper option. A lot of students like getting the general university courses (history, english, etc.) out of the way at community colleges first and then focus on their field of study at university.

Answered by: Syam V. | about 4 years ago
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If your grades aren't strong enough for a university then start out at a community college. Here you can focus and improve your grades. Once you do that you can transfer. If you have strong grades and the means to pay for college go straight to the university.

Answered by: Happy D. | about 4 years ago
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I think that if you are looking to save money, community college first is definitely your better choice. Whether you attend community college or a university, you are just going to be taking your core classes that everyone takes their first two years of college. You might as well be saving your money and paying thousands less in tuition by going to community college. If you choose to do this, just make sure your schools will transfer credits around, so you don't have to take the same class twice.

Answered by: Tonya S H. | over 4 years ago
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Absolutely. As far as credentials go, as long as you graduate from a university, no employer will know where you've earned those credits. It will save you a TON of money that way. People often graduate with student loans, so believe me it's good to save money when you can. The only downside to doing that is you won't get to experience the college life (living on campus, etc) This is a big deal, because you're only this age once in your life.

Answered by: The Truth C. | over 4 years ago
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It all depends on your needs. If you feel as though you are going to have a rough time transitioning to a university, then a community college might be the way to go. It is also a smart idea if you are short on funds.

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | over 4 years ago
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In these economic times, this would be a wise decision for most people. The first two years of college are often spent fulfilling GED requirements and entry level major courses. Almost all of the classes offered at community colleges for these can usually be transferred to a university. Universities traditionally cost anywhere from hundreds to thousands of dollars more to attend than community colleges. By completing courses common to the vast majority of educational institutions and transferring them to the university, you will be saving hundreds or thousands of dollars. If money is not an importance to you, then there is no real benefit to doing so aside from personal preferences.

Answered by: Rancor211 X. | about 4 years ago
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This depends on your financial situation mostly and if you feel more comfortable going to a community college first. The advantage of going to a community college is that it is significantly cheaper than a university. If you do decide to go to community college then make sure that the universities you are applying to will accept the credit from the classes you want to take. Not all credits from all classes will transfer to a 4 year university and the last thing you want to do is retake classes you've already completed. If you have further questions I would suggest talking to a guidance counselor at your high school or at a community college.

Answered by: Jessical Al22 N. | about 4 years ago
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In order to decide whether a university or community college is better for your basics, consider only one thing. Class size! Universities are usually swarming with students, whether they are there for basics or have already advanced and community colleges tend to have a smaller class size. This may not seem important but it can determine whether you pass or fail your courses. It is always best for you to know your professor well enough that they can recall your name when they see you. Now imagine trying to do that with a classroom full of 200 to 500 students! It would be nearly impossible to stand out. Now consider that it is always best to know your professor well enough that if you start to notice that you are going downhill in your course, you can ask for help directly. Now imagine asking for help from your instructor in a classroom full of 200 to 500 students. The instructor just wouldn't have the time! The point is that community college's have less students so that means less work to grade and a friendlier and more relaxed professor. If your in a class full of 20 students, odds are that the instructor can learn your name and actually remember it, and when you start having trouble, they might cut you a break. To prove my point, I'll tell you about my choice of colleges. I chose a community college and I was right in doing so because it's the only way and reason I passed my basics. I don't do well with distractions and community colleges don't have many, as oppose to universities that are full of them. So even after I chose a community college, I started falling behind. But I was determined to pass and I asked for extra work anytime I had the opportunity and my instructor gladly gave it to me. But even when I had completed all extra work along with my normal assignments, I should have failed, but since I knew the instructor and constantly showed up and put my best effort, she gave me a passing grade as well as my other instructors. Now if I had gone to a university, I would failed and had to drop out and that would have wasted my time. And I highly doubt that the professors would have passed me just because they liked me and noticed that I showed up each day and tried hard. They wouldn't have any time to notice that I was even there. In fact, the first few weeks, they try to eliminate as many students as possible at universities so they have less work to grade and I don't blame them. My suggestion is play it safe and choose the community college where you can get more one on one instructing and your courses will cost MUCH less than if you were at a university. I promise you won't regret it and will probably remember ALL of your classmates :)

Answered by: Santiago Sky T. | about 4 years ago
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Attending a community college first can save a lot of money on tuition as you start on your journey toward a degree. A number of factors should be considered though, such as making sure that the credits earned in community college can be transfered to the university. Taking classes at a community college can be great for getting the foundation classes done and then when you transfer, you can focus more on your major.

Answered by: Ladyphenom7 S. | about 4 years ago
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If you want to save money you can take your basic courses at a community college. But also keep in mind that all the classes you take in a community college may not be transferred for full credit. At most you can only transfer about 2 years worth of credit. Universities many times are more difficult than community college in that they are not as lenient in terms of turning papers late and such. If you can afford a university then you should take that opportunity. It you go to a community college first, the money you can save may be huge. Many classes are taught by great professors that expect the best even in a community college but make sure you research that community college first before you decide.

Answered by: Phrisch Later A. | about 4 years ago
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You will most likely save more money going to a community college to take your prerequisites and then transfer to a university to get your bachelors.

Answered by: Rere410 M. | about 4 years ago
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Neither is better than the other, but both have certain advantages and disadvantages. Community colleges save a lot of money on tuition and are great because they are located close to home. They are also great because it gives you a chance to take your pre-requisites and get a taste of what major you want to study. Community colleges have transfer programs that are clearly laid out in helping you transfer to the school of your choice. On the other hand, they have their disadvantages as well. You miss out on the college experience that a lot of your friends will have such as making new friends, living in a dorm, joining a sorority or fraternity and having an overall sense of connection with your school. You can do a lot of those things when you transfer from a community college but some people feel that they are too old to do those things by the time they transfer.

Answered by: Christie18 L. | about 4 years ago
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Many students first attend community college and then transfer to a university. If you want to save money an stay close to home, I would highly recommend attending community college first. That way you will gain both the community college experience and the university experience!

Answered by: Iamerica N. | about 4 years ago
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In my opinion, generally no. If you know exactly which college you're going to transfer to, and exactly what major you'll be going for, and you very carefully take classes that will transfer, then you can save a bundle of money and probably end up with a better GPA in the process by going to a community college for the first couple years. The problem is most people don't know what they want to pursue in college, or change their minds partway through. You may end up stuck with a bunch of community college credits that don't transfer, thus forcing you to retake classes. If you know you want to obtain a four year degree, then go to a four college.

Answered by: Wennifred K. | about 4 years ago
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Not necessarily. This would be better if you still are unable to make up your mind about which school to attend or if you would miss home too much. Try to get into a reputable university as soon as possible.

Answered by: Dinner! K. | about 4 years ago
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When you finally graduate college, your degree will say the name of the college that you graduated from - not the ones that you started at. Community colleges are closer to home, so they are an easier transition than going away to school. They are also easier to get into, which makes applying less stressful. Above all, they are much, much cheaper than going to a university. Generally speaking, the education that you receive at community colleges are just as good as the experience at universities - especially for general ed. requirements! Save money while you can.

Answered by: Vinny T I. | about 4 years ago
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Going straight to university and going the community college route are both equally good options. Going to community college first has many advantages; you save money for the first year or two of college (during which you wouldn't really be taking classes for your major anyway), you can get into more universities than you could straight out of high school, and you get some time to decide what you want to do.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
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I think it can be better for you in the long run. It always helps to give community college a try if you're unsure about what you want to do with the rest of your life or think you might change your mind. You can get all of your basic classes out of the way while you work and save up money. Then you can transfer when you are ready.

Answered by: Jen B. | about 4 years ago
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I am finishing my last semester of community college now and I will graduate in May. I absolutely LOVED my experience and couldn't ask for more. My college offered many different opportunities and it was easy to rise up in a small pool of people. I am the president of our honor society, graduated our leadership program and have much more too offer to the job market. Actually, I work for my college now and have many professional contacts to use in the future. This experience is a great one if you choose to take the time to enjoy it. Students at community colleges are known to get better grades due to wanting to transfer quickly and having the time to focus on academics rather than the pressure of campus life. I am graduating in my two year time frame and I am not a slacker. So my answer is yes, yes an yes go to community college first. Save your money and stay away from the student loans. My next college is taking all my credits and I am not having any issues transferring.

Answered by: Brittany D. | over 2 years ago
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Whether it's better or not is relative. A community college is definitely cheaper and admissions is easier than going straight from high school. But it's all personal preference; a lot of people prefer to go straight to a university for the "freshman experience" and things like that, but it's all up to you.

Answered by: Fishfish T. | about 4 years ago
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I wouldn't suggest going that route, you may save money with community college, but the university will not accept all of your credits. There is nothign worse than transferring schools and finding out 15 credits are non transferable. I know when I was in college I never wanted to take a course again, its a pain, and also a waste of time and money.

Answered by: Jon H. | about 4 years ago
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If money is an issue, community college first is sometimes better. If at all possible, go to a 4 year. The schooling offered is generally better.

Answered by: Molea06 I. | about 4 years ago
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If money is an issue, community college first is sometimes better. If at all possible, go to a 4 year. The schooling offered is generally better.

Answered by: Molea06 I. | about 4 years ago
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Yes. If you go to a community college first, then you would have already completed two years, be halfway done with your degree or more, and also have saved a lot of money (1200 a year for community college, 25000 for a four year college). Also, classes are smaller and the transition from high school (or haven't have been in school for a while) to college is easier. I find the offices at community colleges are always more willing to help students and easier to get in touch with because there are less students (same goes for teachers). Lastly, college credits count more than high school ones, which makes acceptance to high ranking colleges easier (transfers are more eligible and wanted because they have proven they could handle the college). Finally, if your high school grades are bad, they will not be taken into considertaion when applying for a four year college if you are a transfer student.

Answered by: Mayell U. | about 4 years ago
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It's not "better," but it has its benefits. First, you'll be able to save some money. Community colleges are cheaper, plus if you attend a college in your hometown, you might be able to save on rent by staying with your parents. At a community college you're able to take general requirement classes like math and history and get them out of the way. Then, when you transfer to a university, you can focus all your energy on your specific area of study. Be sure to check with both schools about transferable credit, though, since it will differ from school to school.

Answered by: Syam V. | about 4 years ago
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I think it's a great way to save some money and get used to the college lifestyle. It can also help you decide which major or minor to declare. As long as all your class credits can be transferred easily, it shouldn't be a problem .

Answered by: Syam V. | about 4 years ago
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If your grades aren't strong enough for a university then start out at a community college. Here you can focus and improve your grades. Once you do that you can transfer. If you have strong grades and the means to pay for college go straight to the university.

Answered by: Happy D. | about 4 years ago
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I think if you attend community college before transferring to a university, you're only kidding yourself. People who attend community college tend to be slackers. If you want to get a real degree, man-up, work hard and apply for university. Community college is just a cop-out and will probably make you the laughing stock of your graduating high school class. A lot of people try to say it's better to go to community college first, but they all work at McDonalds.

Answered by: Arizonafink B. | about 4 years ago
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