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Is there hope for someone with ADD / ADHD to go to college and succeed?

Topic: Academics | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 06/17/2010

Answers (36)

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Depends on the severity of the ADD/ADHD you can be able to go to college and succeed very well. One of the important things to remember is to be organized with a schedule of all of your classes. I would also bring a tape recorder and record the lesson if your professor allows it. I would also recommend taking a lot of notes as you are being occupied and you are not bored. With these tips you can become successful in college with ADD/ADHD.

Answered by: All Incorp O. | about 4 years ago
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Yes, there is absolutely hope for someone with ADD/ADHD to go to college and succeed. Assuming you got into college in the first place, you need to make the necessary adjustments to make sure you will be successful at your new school. Remember that if you have an established IEP with accommodations for your exceptionality, it becomes your responsibility to make sure those accommodations are met in college. For example, this might mean you go to the learning services center in your school and schedule tutoring when necessary. Meet with your professors and make sure you know the expectations for class so that you can meet them. Just remember that it is going to be up to you to structure things so that you can be successful. So think about things like getting to class, finding study time, and completing homework, and plan for them before they turn into issues. If you know that you are not going to be able to do things without some parental involvement, plan to attend a school close to home. If you are prepared and make a plan for yourself, success will find you, despite your exceptionality.

Answered by: Dan.Mc Donald F. | about 4 years ago
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Yes! While it may be a difficult process of course someone with ADD/ADHD can succeed in college. Many colleges have a department for students with disabilities. They can help you with all of you needs. They can get you extra time on assignments and on exams too. Talk to your professors, most are very willing to accommodate you. Of course, it will take a lot of work on your part as well. Making sure that you take your prescribed medicine as directed will greatly increase your abilities to concentrate in class and on your studies.

Answered by: Keepsmiling F. | about 4 years ago
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Absolutely there's hope. You already know what works and what doesn't work for you as a person with ADD / ADHD and I'm willing to bet you know what doesn't work for you. Take notes - sticky notes if necessary - and put them everywhere. Set up a schedule and put it somewhere you'll find it. Have friends remind you when to do homework. In class, if it helps to multi-task (I made Kanji flashcards to alleviate boredom) do so, as long as it doesn't take all the focus off lectures.

Answered by: Irishboy51 Z. | about 4 years ago
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I believe there is hope for someone with any condition to actually go to college and succeed. People should not judge a person due to a disability. Many people in this world have actually beat the odds. ADD/ADHD should not ban anyone from disqualification from a school. A person could be taking meds for that and it will help them with control. So yes there is great hope for people with ADD/ADHD.

Answered by: Anonymous J. | about 4 years ago
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Absolutely, I havea mild case of ADHD and personally know the problems with concentration and time management. I came to the decision that I had to do everything I could to get around my problem. I invested in a really good planner where I wrote down all assignment due, as well as everything else I had to do. My biggest problem was procrastination because I couldn't just settle down and complete something when Istill had a week or more before the due date.

Answered by: Jon H. | about 4 years ago
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A person with ADD/ADHD can easily go to college. While there will be a bit more prep work involved when choosing the colleges you want to apply to, it will be well worth it to find a school that has a support system for ADD/ADHD in place already. The first question you need to ask is if the director of the Office of Disabled Student Services is a specialist in this area. If that person is, he/she will be able to give you all the information you need to feel comfortable choosing this school.

Answered by: Annie O. K. | about 4 years ago
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Yes. Many people have been greatly successful in their college careers. Many professors suffer from ADD as well. It is harder, but still entirely possible if you put your mind to it.

Answered by: Steve Man D. | about 4 years ago
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Of course there is. Colleges nowadays are more sensitive to the needs of students with ADD/ADHD. Many colleges have specific programs designed to aid students with ADD. Go to your advisor and speak with them; they can point you in the right direction.

Answered by: Boylen33 D. | about 4 years ago
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Yes with ADD you can get medications to help with the day to day. Also just a diagnosis with ADD can help immensely. Once someone knows there is a problem they are on their way to a solution

Answered by: Zolty F. | about 4 years ago
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Yes! My husband, for example graduated with a degree in engineering with severe ADD. He got a 60k/year job immediately after he graduated. Medication and/or close self-monitoring is necessary to get ahead with that disorder. Some schools have resources set up for people with learning disorders, so check those out.

Answered by: Junior Sweet P. | about 4 years ago
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Of course there is. You can find special help for a student with ADD or ADHD. Medications will also help the student. If the student wants to succeed, they can.

Answered by: Jimm 43 I. | about 4 years ago
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Absolutely! While there isn't a specific cure for ADD / ADHD, there are many treatment approaches available that significantly decrease the symptoms in order for the individual to achieve success in both college and their professional career. Utilizing a multi-modal approach, an individual with ADD / ADHD has a high likelihood of success.

Answered by: Amusebouche O. | about 4 years ago
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Yes there is. I am living proof. You take all the paper work (IEPs) that you had from school and you start implementiing them yourself. Sitting at the front of the class, breaking up your homework into smaller chunks, getting a tutor, studying in small groups, taking notes, recording lectures. The key is to be proactive and set yourself up for success. Also, many medicines that may have worked for you will stop working for you as you get older. If you are under medication, then go back to your doctor and see if their might be an alternative. If you stopped taking medications because of the side effects or you just didn't want to take them anymore, I suggest you also see your doctor and take something for your first year at least.

Answered by: L Platter F. | about 4 years ago
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Absolutely! ADD and ADHD is considered a protected "disability" and that person can go talk to the disability services office of their school if they need any special accomodations. I have a friend who was diagnosed with ADD in high school. She majored in social work in college and is now tutoring special needs high schoolers who are struggling with the same disorder. She talked frequently with professors and the disability services office about her issues and her needs. The schools will work with the student around granting extensions, note taking, and testing environments. There are also online classes and distance learning classes if the regular classroom environment is too stressful. Contact the school's disability services office and you may be surprised to hear all the different options available.

Answered by: Ker230 S. | about 4 years ago
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There is definitely hope as I have ADD, and I am doing quite well. There are many opportunities offered for people with learning disabilities. If you utilize these tools you will do quite well. Also, choosing a major that is of interest to you is important so not to become quickly bored. Teachers will let you take tests by yourself so as not get distracted. If the desire to do well is there, then you should do quite well.

Answered by: Babagday B. | about 4 years ago
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Of course there's hope! Many people attend college with different types of disabilities and go on to a successful future. Colleges have a disability department you can contact that can help you if you have concerns. If you want to attend college - don't let anything stop you! It may be more difficult, but with the drive, you can succeed.

Answered by: Caitlin L. | about 4 years ago
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This more depends on the level of attention problems the student is dealing with and the amount of help he/she is getting to face those issues. If it is a large enough issue, it would be wise for the student to seek help through the school's student health/counseling center. Medications are often helpful, but not the only option for such problems. It is important not to be overwhelmed, so maybe think about going part-time as he/she adjusts. Many people "phase" out of the major ADD problems as they mature, so it would be unfortunate to hold oneself back early on.

Answered by: Rosco D. | about 4 years ago
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Most definitely! Having ADD/ADHD should not be a deterrent from furthering your education. Most colleges should have programs and/or support systems in place for students with ADD/ADHD. Professors and Advisors will be willing and able to accommodate you, and provide you with additional help if it is needed.

Answered by: Wonderwoman G. | about 4 years ago
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There is definitely hope for someone with a disability to succeed in college. Of course, there are challenges the individual must face. Such things as increased social distractions or less family support. Some skills can really help the person out though. For example, working on organization skills or their study skills. If you are really worried, there are colleges that specialize and accommodate students with certain disabilities. Landmark College is one that specialize in ADHD. In the end, success falls to the individual.

Answered by: Boskie B. | about 4 years ago
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Yes, there is hope! You may have to do some additional preparation, though. Medication can help some people, so talk to your doctor. Talk to a counselor about study strategies and ways to stay focused. Finally, see if your school's disability office has suggestions for accommodations, like exams in a quiet place.

Answered by: Laura46 I. | about 4 years ago
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Of course there is! Although it may be more difficult for someone with ADD/ADHD, it is definitely still possible- just keep your eye on the prize! It would be important to share your health condition with your school counselor and/or professors so they can adjust the coursework to your needs- they are usually very helpful and understanding.

Answered by: Brittanycalla X. | about 4 years ago
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Absolutely! I have ADD/ADHD and am currently in graduate school. Most schools have resources devoted to students with learning disabilities, so you should seek them out right away. You can even meet with them on college tours to find out what can be done to make college successful for you. You shouldn't worry that this will hold you back, if you want an education than you can do it. You might have to work a little harder at it than your peers, but it can be done. Counselors can work closely with you to help you develop good study habits and can help you work with professors to make the material as accessible to you as possible and tests as fair for you as for everyone else.

Answered by: Ilovecollege E. | about 4 years ago
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Yes!! Countless people have done it. If you feel that your ADD/ADHD interferes with your ability to succeed in college, then you definitely need to see a doctor. They can prescribe you medicine that will help control your symptoms and will allow you to focus on the things you need to do. There are plenty of successful students who have ADD/ADHD.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
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Of course there's hope! Many people attend college with different types of disabilities and go on to a successful future. Colleges have a disability department you can contact that can help you if you have concerns. If you want to attend college - don't let anything stop you! It may be more difficult, but with the drive, you can succeed.

Answered by: Caitlin L. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

This more depends on the level of attention problems the student is dealing with and the amount of help he/she is getting to face those issues. If it is a large enough issue, it would be wise for the student to seek help through the school's student health/counseling center. Medications are often helpful, but not the only option for such problems. It is important not to be overwhelmed, so maybe think about going part-time as he/she adjusts. Many people "phase" out of the major ADD problems as they mature, so it would be unfortunate to hold oneself back early on.

Answered by: Rosco D. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

Most definitely! Having ADD/ADHD should not be a deterrent from furthering your education. Most colleges should have programs and/or support systems in place for students with ADD/ADHD. Professors and Advisors will be willing and able to accommodate you, and provide you with additional help if it is needed.

Answered by: Wonderwoman G. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

There is definitely hope for someone with a disability to succeed in college. Of course, there are challenges the individual must face. Such things as increased social distractions or less family support. Some skills can really help the person out though. For example, working on organization skills or their study skills. If you are really worried, there are colleges that specialize and accommodate students with certain disabilities. Landmark College is one that specialize in ADHD. In the end, success falls to the individual.

Answered by: Boskie B. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

Yes, there is hope! You may have to do some additional preparation, though. Medication can help some people, so talk to your doctor. Talk to a counselor about study strategies and ways to stay focused. Finally, see if your school's disability office has suggestions for accommodations, like exams in a quiet place.

Answered by: Laura46 I. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

Of course there is! Although it may be more difficult for someone with ADD/ADHD, it is definitely still possible- just keep your eye on the prize! It would be important to share your health condition with your school counselor and/or professors so they can adjust the coursework to your needs- they are usually very helpful and understanding.

Answered by: Brittanycalla X. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

Absolutely! I have ADD/ADHD and am currently in graduate school. Most schools have resources devoted to students with learning disabilities, so you should seek them out right away. You can even meet with them on college tours to find out what can be done to make college successful for you. You shouldn't worry that this will hold you back, if you want an education than you can do it. You might have to work a little harder at it than your peers, but it can be done. Counselors can work closely with you to help you develop good study habits and can help you work with professors to make the material as accessible to you as possible and tests as fair for you as for everyone else.

Answered by: Ilovecollege E. | about 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
Gravatar

Yes!! Countless people have done it. If you feel that your ADD/ADHD interferes with your ability to succeed in college, then you definitely need to see a doctor. They can prescribe you medicine that will help control your symptoms and will allow you to focus on the things you need to do. There are plenty of successful students who have ADD/ADHD.

Answered by: Ralloh X. | about 4 years ago
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  • Not My Experience 0
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Absolutely! There are medicines to help with ADD/ADHD and they can be a tremendous amount of help. If you'd rather not take meds, you can still do well in college without them. Find what works best for you to be able to focus. Quiet or background noise? Music or no? With a group or by yourself?

Answered by: Smart1 I. | over 4 years ago
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There most certainly is! Just make sure that you take your medication daily. If you do not take medication, try Vitamin B, it really helps. Just keep trying and know that you CAN do anything!

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | over 4 years ago
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Yes there hope for someone with add/adhd to go to colleges.firstly your condition checking and your problem to join to college and schools.If the primary place of behavior problems is at school, learning disabilities may be the cause of ill behavior.And also join to worm up schools.

Answered by: Hanjy J. | over 4 years ago
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There is lots of hope for someone with ADD/ADHD when it comes to success in college. The most important advice is to use your resources. Check with your college or university to see if they have any programs for individuals with ADD/ADHD. In addition, stay away from "partying", take care of yourself, and make sure that you have a realistic view of your strengths and weaknesses. You can do it!

Answered by: Kasey1720 S. | about 4 years ago
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