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My daughter just entered her freshman year at a small liberal arts college and the room?clearly designed for two?is housing three students. How will this overcrowding impact her academics?

Topic: Housing | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 06/17/2010

Answers (35)

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The impact is going to depend on whether there are other suitable places to study. My freshman year, I was in a dinky 10x12 dorm room with another person, and studying was not comfortable in there. What I did was study in the campus courtyard when the weather was good, or staked out a spot in the science building if it was cold, rainy, or snowy. It's kind of perverse, but you can take heart in the fact that statistically, at least one person in that room will drop out of college after the first quarter semester.

Answered by: Null Terminator N. | almost 4 years ago
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It can have profound negative effects depending on your daughter as well as the roommates that she has. Studying is an essential part of success in college. If she can't find the time or the space necessary to get quality study time, her academic performance will suffer. However, that being said, there are things that she can do to help make things easier for her in the cramped quarters. Invest in a good pair of earplugs, a decent desk lamp and a comfortable desk chair. If she needs to study but her roommates are either sleeping or engaging in noisy activities, these items will help ensure that your daughter can study with as few distractions as possible. Also make it clear to your daughter that she needs to be very determined and focused. Cramped living quarters can create the desire to procrastinate, especially when roommates are doing something more fun than studying.

Answered by: Upallnight I. | over 3 years ago
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Many colleges across the country have some percentage of "forced triples". This means that three students are forced to live in a room designed for just two. Fortunately these arrangements are usually temporary so there's not too much to worry about. As long as the two other students she is living with are respectful of her and as considerate as possible given the conditions this living situation shouldn't impact her academics. It will force her to go out to study in the library or study lounges which is a good thing because it allows you to separate your work environment from your sleep environment. This separation will actually be better for her academics and sleeping ability in the long run.

Answered by: Keepsmiling F. | over 3 years ago
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Overcrowding is frustrating, and it could possibly have negative effects on your daughter's study habits. You can raise your concerns to the university's housing department in hopes that something more suitable can be arranged, but don't expect too much since they are always dealing with overcrowding for freshmen students. Your best options are to either pay for an off-campus apartment or just live with it. That likely isn't what you wanted to hear, but it's the truth.

Answered by: Cocky0 P. | over 3 years ago
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First, find out if the third student is supposed to be there. If she is, maybe it's time for your daughter to look for a different dorm. If none are available, look into getting her an off campus apartment. An overcrowded dorm isn't a good learning environment, and I'd try my best to get her out of it.

Answered by: Syam V. | almost 4 years ago
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This could effect her studying or sleeping habits. Sometimes its hard for someone that is used to having their on room to share such a small space. The better she gets along with her roommates the better it is. Setting alarms and sleeping might be an issue. I know they try to match people with people who have like wise habbits.

Answered by: Kw29 H. | almost 4 years ago
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Well that depends on many things. First is how well she gets along with her roommates. Tripling rooms however is a common occurrence in college and most students don't seem to have a problem with this. If one of them is loud this can naturally disrupt studies or if one of them likes to party this can as well. However, these are problems that occur among doubles as well. Honestly other then dealing with the crowded room, it should not be any different then if she had one roommate.

Answered by: College Student123 T. | almost 4 years ago
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This might help her. Some students find that studying with friends encourages them to keep going. Other students find it distracting. If she is having trouble focusing with two other people, have her find a place on campus. The library is usually open quire late and can be a very quiet place for studying.

Answered by: Allgrw P. | almost 4 years ago
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Many times schools overcrowd dorms in the begining of the semester because they have simply run out of room to house everyone. They do this because statistically they know that unfortunately a certain percentage of students will drop out or leave or transfer within the first month or two. Your daughter can put herself on a waitlist to be considered next to move into a room for 2 when someone leaves. In the meantime, she might have better luck studying in the library until the dorms quiet down.

Answered by: Coleb Q. | almost 4 years ago
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Many rooms at colleges contain three students due to how many students there are now. As to how it will affect her academics, her living situation could either make it suffer or get better. She could suffer due to not getting along with roomates and the noise could impair her ability to finished her work and sleep. However, if her roomates become friends, she could find relief of stress in them and they could become people she could talk to and study with.

Answered by: Mayell U. | almost 4 years ago
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It won't. My school tripled freshmen and I did quite well in my first year. The situation is what you make of it. If there is too much noise then your daughter can always go to the library. If anything it is better because you get two new friends!

Answered by: Celebrate Z. | almost 4 years ago
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If your daughter is used to dealing with distractions at home, the overcrowding of her dorm room will not likely affect her academics. However, if she needs peace and quiet to study, she needs to study somewhere quiet on campus. You might suggest that she block out specific times each day to go to the library, computer lab, or other quiet place on campus.

Answered by: Exadvisor33 A. | almost 4 years ago
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It might be uncomfortable for her to study in her dorm. There are plenty of other options of places to study. Hopefully she will get along with her roommates so she won't get distracted.

Answered by: Mrs Potts B. | almost 4 years ago
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Talk to the housing director and ask why they need to overcrowd. Ask for a refund or a discount. You should consider having your daughter move off campus.

Answered by: Zolty F. | almost 4 years ago
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It shouldn't impact her academics as long as she is aware of the potential problems that can occur early on and proactively take steps to avoid those issues. First of all, it would be wise of you to sit down with her and have serious communication about such things as partying/drinking alcohol and studying. Secondly, she needs to find a place to study on campus that is quiet and will give her plenty of space to concentrate, such as the library or student lounges. Thirdly, she needs to sit down with her new roommates early on and establish ground rules. They should discuss things like curfew, guest rules, cleaning, and shopping expectations for each other and write all of it down on a piece of paper that they sign. Hopefully that will motivate them to treat each other respectfully, but if there are problems, their "contract" can be shown to the person in charge of their housing facility. Good luck to your daughter!

Answered by: Sberrywoman16 Y. | almost 4 years ago
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I doubt it will affect her studies too much. Most studying is done at a library anyway. If I were you I would contact the school adminstrator and find out why they are crowding. You might also consider moving her off campus ( you can get a waiver if necessary). My freshman year the only thing I did in my room was sleep and hang out with friends.

Answered by: Zolty F. | almost 4 years ago
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Students crowded into too-small dorm rooms will often have less study time and added stress. It___s usually easier for two roommates to coexist rather than three or four. The more bodies squeezed into a small space, the more likely it is that there will be multiple sleeping schedules and study schedules as well as many multiple visitors. Your daughter might actually do just fine, just keep in contact with her and let her know if it gets to hard to deal with that she can contact the resident advisor to try and work something out to make better arrangements.

Answered by: Jen B. | almost 4 years ago
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It might have a detrimental effect on her. If that is the case, advise her to go to the library to study or somewhere less populated. This will be best for her.

Answered by: Cage B. | almost 4 years ago
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Hopefully it won't be too bad. Most kids are able to adjust to less than comfy living situations. She may have to go to the library more rather than studying in her room. If she is a person who needs a lot of down time, or quiet time, that may be more difficult with two roommates. On the other hand, she will most likely start the year knowing 2 people.

Answered by: Jojo U. | almost 4 years ago
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It may be a bit hard to study in the room with more people in there. If studying is difficult with distractions, she should find a place where she is comfortable to study. The library is usually open pretty late for students to study. Even finding a couch in a hallway can be the best place to study if she is comfortable. Maybe having people around will not even impact her academics.

Answered by: Allgrw P. | almost 4 years ago
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While it is very unfortunate to be crowded in one's own dorm room, I think you may rest assured that probably won't affect her academics too much. As a guy, I have had my share of loud roommates. Recommend to her that she go away to one of the study rooms in the library or possibly in her dorm to do her studying if things are too loud. She can also ask her roommates to be mindful of her studies. All-in-all - I think that she'll be okay. No matter how tight they are packed in there, she does still have the rest of the campus to study!

Answered by: Rx Josh I. | almost 4 years ago
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Overcrowding has an unfortunate tendency to effect students badly. There is more noise generated by three people than two people; also, she may feel she will have to "fight" for appropriate space. However, if you and your daughter approach this with the right attitude, there is much to be gained from the situation. She will learn very quickly how important compromise is, when it is necessary to stick up for herself (if her roommates want to allow people to spend the night on weekdays, and she does not), and how to tell the difference. She will also learn how she studies best; if noise is a distraction, she will want to study at the library more often. She should approach the other women with an open and respectful attitude, and they may be able to help her integrate into the college. Your daughter has the power to make the best of the situation, and who knows? Maybe they will turn out to be her best friends!

Answered by: Carrina22 T. | almost 4 years ago
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It all depends on how she functions. She can probably do her studying in the library, where it is quiet and hopefully not so crowded. The only thing I would really be worried about is her not getting enough sleep. Three girls in a room is never good, when two want to stay up all night and one wants to sleep.

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | almost 4 years ago
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The transition into a dorm room can be a difficult one, especially when space is limitied. It is important in these types of situations to establish clear rules and boundaries for all of the roommates. This can help avoid tense situations which can lead to a distraction from academics. In my experience, it can be beneficial to study outside of the living space. For instance, the library is a great alternative to a dorm room. If this is not possible, it is critical to establish a "quiet" time in the room where studying can be done without interruptions. If any of the roommates are uncooperative and disruptive, then the higher authorities can be notified and proper steps can be taken.

Answered by: Caitlin L. | almost 4 years ago
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With enrollment rising and no money to build new dorms, lots of students are experiencing overcrowding. Your daughter may have to consider using other space - for example, always studying in the library rather than in a crowded room. She should also talk to her roommates and come to some agreements on how to use the room so they can all use it productively without impacting their academics. Maybe the room needs to always be a quiet space for sleeping and resting, with socializing and talking on the phone elsewhere.

Answered by: Larua46 L. | almost 4 years ago
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I believe the impact on your daughter in this situation really depends on her personality and work ethic. If she is having a hard time studying with more students in her room, she could try utilizing the library or other venue. Also, if she is upset about her lack of personal space, she could consider speaking with a housing director about switching room assignments. But, if her and her roommates make sure to clearly set out guidelines such as bathroom times,lights out, and visitors, they are sure to have a perfectly fine room experience.

Answered by: Jpeltz Q. | almost 4 years ago
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The impact the housing has on your daughter will be defined by your daughter and by her roommates. If your daughter is dedicated to her studies, she'll be fine. If she's easily distracted, however, the living situation could effect her. College roommates are just like any other living arrangement, it can be good or bad depending on what the people involved make of it.

Answered by: Stan567 Z. | almost 4 years ago
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Overcrowding has an unfortunate tendency to effect students badly. There is more noise generated by three people than two people; also, she may feel she will have to "fight" for appropriate space. However, if you and your daughter approach this with the right attitude, there is much to be gained from the situation. She will learn very quickly how important compromise is, when it is necessary to stick up for herself (if her roommates want to allow people to spend the night on weekdays, and she does not), and how to tell the difference. She will also learn how she studies best; if noise is a distraction, she will want to study at the library more often. She should approach the other women with an open and respectful attitude, and they may be able to help her integrate into the college. Your daughter has the power to make the best of the situation, and who knows? Maybe they will turn out to be her best friends!

Answered by: Carrina22 T. | almost 4 years ago
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It all depends on how she functions. She can probably do her studying in the library, where it is quiet and hopefully not so crowded. The only thing I would really be worried about is her not getting enough sleep. Three girls in a room is never good, when two want to stay up all night and one wants to sleep.

Answered by: Crystal Can Do That I. | almost 4 years ago
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The transition into a dorm room can be a difficult one, especially when space is limitied. It is important in these types of situations to establish clear rules and boundaries for all of the roommates. This can help avoid tense situations which can lead to a distraction from academics. In my experience, it can be beneficial to study outside of the living space. For instance, the library is a great alternative to a dorm room. If this is not possible, it is critical to establish a "quiet" time in the room where studying can be done without interruptions. If any of the roommates are uncooperative and disruptive, then the higher authorities can be notified and proper steps can be taken.

Answered by: Caitlin L. | almost 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
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With enrollment rising and no money to build new dorms, lots of students are experiencing overcrowding. Your daughter may have to consider using other space - for example, always studying in the library rather than in a crowded room. She should also talk to her roommates and come to some agreements on how to use the room so they can all use it productively without impacting their academics. Maybe the room needs to always be a quiet space for sleeping and resting, with socializing and talking on the phone elsewhere.

Answered by: Larua46 L. | almost 4 years ago
  • Helpful 0
  • Not My Experience 0
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I believe the impact on your daughter in this situation really depends on her personality and work ethic. If she is having a hard time studying with more students in her room, she could try utilizing the library or other venue. Also, if she is upset about her lack of personal space, she could consider speaking with a housing director about switching room assignments. But, if her and her roommates make sure to clearly set out guidelines such as bathroom times,lights out, and visitors, they are sure to have a perfectly fine room experience.

Answered by: Jpeltz Q. | almost 4 years ago
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The impact the housing has on your daughter will be defined by your daughter and by her roommates. If your daughter is dedicated to her studies, she'll be fine. If she's easily distracted, however, the living situation could effect her. College roommates are just like any other living arrangement, it can be good or bad depending on what the people involved make of it.

Answered by: Stan567 Z. | almost 4 years ago
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Well students away from home going to college tend to achieve the same.Students love the freedom becoming independant away from home so if accomidations are tight sometimes they don't mind. Friends to them are more important.Im sure studying will get accomplished.

Answered by: Fruitloops17 B. | almost 4 years ago
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I will absolutely accept her in a negative way. Dorms are already small enough, even for two. I would explain the situation to anyone who has the power to change it at her school. Remember, the squeaky wheel gets the grease! Be assertive and direct, let them know that this is unacceptable and you will not tolerate your daughter's education be compromised because of overcrowding. Your daughter will have trouble getting quiet time to study and will most likely be easily distracted.

Answered by: Katat Ull O. | almost 4 years ago
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