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What's the point of declaring a minor, honestly?

Topic: Academics | Asked by: Anonymous | Asked on 06/17/2010

Answers (42)

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Declaring a minor is a smart thing to do. The most important reason is because you always want to have something to fall back on. You never know when you might get bored with the career you chose in the beginning or if the economy gets bad enough that you won't be able to continue work in that same field. Having that safety net insures that you can always do something else. Even if you haven't declared a minor yet, you can always do it later. Many people even go back to school to gain more knowledge and pursue other careers.

Answered by: Jen B. | over 4 years ago
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A minor will give you something to fall back on. You might end up hating the career that you chose in the beginning and your minor will insure that you can switch careers without having to go back to school. With the economy the way it is, having a minor gives you a 2nd option for work as well.

Answered by: Jen B. | over 4 years ago
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A minor is something that you have an interest in. Declaring one can make going to class exciting. Also once you get out of college businesses like to see those extra fields of study.

Answered by: Lanig91 B. | over 4 years ago
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There are good reasons to declare a minor. It will let others know an area where you are well educated. This way when you work a job, you may get a promotion based on your knowledge. This promotion could lead to extra money or less work. Either way it is worth declaring a minor.

Answered by: Average Joe V. | about 4 years ago
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Declaring a minor and sticking with it can be useful in showing a future employer a further specialization past your major. This can give you a leg up on the competition for your future job. Additionally, adding a minor shows a hard-working and self-disciplined spirit, something employers are only too happy to find.

Answered by: Adamkendallz V. | over 4 years ago
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Declaring a minor gives you something else to be skilled in besides your major when you graduate. This is helpful because it makes you useful to prospective employers in more ways than one. For instance if you majored in biology and minored in marketing, you would be a good candidate for a job as a drug rep, but if you majored in Biology and minored in Psychology, that would put you in a better position to pursue a degree in psychiatry.

Answered by: Junior Sweet P. | over 4 years ago
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Some courses at some universities require you to declare a minor in order to take some courses. A minor tells employers about some experience which may not be represented in your major. Honest? there isn't much of a point until graduation.

Answered by: Zolty F. | over 4 years ago
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When declaring a minor in college you are not only allowing yourself the opportunity to explore a field other than your major, but prepare yourself for a more well rounded career. Many employers look for individuals with variety in their skills and knowledge. Your minor can bolster your resume. The more skills you have entering the job world the better.You may even find that half way through your education you want to pursue your minor instead of of your major.

Answered by: Kay May Q. | over 4 years ago
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It isn't necessary usually... I would say focus more on your major, if you are sure about it... Don't just take the minimum amount... Also, take advanced classes that relate to your major. I have a more general minor in Humanities but could have been more specific,,, Why did I do this? Because I was taking upper level very interesting classes that complimented my major. I took the most interesting electives available... Your electives are there for a reason. And minors generally, nowhere I have seen even appear on a resume. The department might issue a sheet of paper but by no means is this really a "credential" it's just resume padding. I would take classes you are interest in... if you are interested in Beethoven, take a beethoven class, interesting in theater...take a theater class, ...but definitely focus on your major for sure if you know what you want to do... picking a minor often diverted me from my real interests, hence why I went with a more general one. I would view a double major or a double minor, as a lack of focus... or thinking, does the person really want to do the minor instead? Same thing with grad school applications... They are going to look at your actual TRANSCRIPTS and see what classes you took, minor, or no minor. Ask yourself what would be better?? Taking 4-5 upper level elective classes that you don't get anything "printed" for, or wasting those classes away on a minor? I say definitely the 4-5 upper level classes are more valuable, look more impressive to grad schools, and you yourself will know you learned more, and will make you more educated than filling the minor requirements. I say this because a lot of minor requirements are relatively weak and boring, very basic stuff. If you can take more interesting classes in your subjects of interest, by all means do so! You'll enjoy the courses more and probably get a better grade instead of trying to get a minor, double minor, or any other extra "credential" Mold your classes to fit you, don't focus on a "credential"...

Answered by: Bobo J. | about 2 years ago
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It's an easy way to let people know you took certain classes. I have a business minor, so even without listing it on my resume, people know that I probably took accounting, finance, marketing and other business classes that are required across the board. I also have an English lit minor, which is often just a conversation starter. They're nice to have on your resume for entry-level jobs, but probably won't make a difference after you have more job experience.

Answered by: Taylor C. | over 2 years ago
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The only benefit to declaring a minor, as I see it, is to have access to coursework that you might not otherwise have access to. For example, you may not be able to register for French IV without a major or minor attached. Departments use majors and minors for funding purposes, but the student benefit is pretty minimal in declaring a minor. They can appease a worried parent as well. If you're majoring in music, adding a business minor makes your choice a little more palatable.

Answered by: Grad12 I. | over 4 years ago
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Minors are often given more importance by incoming students then they deserve. The fact of the matter is that a minor is not of any particular importance in terms of later job prospects. It has several benefits: It might show an employer that the prospective employee is 'well-rounded', i.e., a major in mathematics and a minor in art might be impressive. Also, it gives the student something concrete to show for classes that they might take just for fun. Finally, some programs are desirable but too small to warrant a major, in this case, they might be structured as a minor.

Answered by: Njanetos U. | over 4 years ago
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Although there are some colleges that identify minors on transcripts, for the majority of students declaring one simply allows you to further develop your knowledge of a certain field. Although it might not be as important as your major, the classes you take in a minor can serve to provide you with a more well-balanced education.

Answered by: Paris587 U. | over 4 years ago
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It's mostly for your own personal satisfaction. In some instances, it could put you ahead when it comes to getting a job. If the job you want has you and another, nearly identical candidate to choose from, a minor could put you ahead. For example, if they have projects in France, and they see that you have a minor in French and the other person doesn't, you're more likely to be hired. Whereas, if you just took some French courses, the odds that they will look at your individual courses and note that you may speak French are slimmer.

Answered by: Anrimala36 C. | over 4 years ago
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Declaring a minor is good for your self accomplishment, knowing you have some sort of a degree in an additional subject you love to study. It is also "an excuse" for you to be able to take classes in a subject you love while being able to show something for it in the end. In the end though, it doesn't help with much and if you don't think it is worth it to take the extra classes just for the minor, you probably shouldn't pursue it.

Answered by: Volblorx8634 P. | over 4 years ago
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There are not a lot of advantages of declaring a minor. They are useful items to put on your resume. The interview process for jobs can be very competitive and any advantage you can get is good. Having minors in your degree can make you a more versatile employee for the company that is hiring you.

Answered by: Turker Y. | over 4 years ago
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From a purely logistical standpoint, I haven't found that there's that much benefit. I think it's mainly an interest thing, since most colleges require far more credits than you really need from a major. For instance, I majored in psychology just because I thought it was cool. That said, I'm glad I did, because I actually use a lot of the principles I learned in daily life outside my job.

Answered by: Null Terminator N. | over 4 years ago
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I know that declaring a major may seem pointless, but there are many reasons it can be beneficial in the long run. For one, you can gain more knowledge in your field. If you have a major in a language, you could minor in linguistics. These groupings can better your understanding of your personal interest. Furthermore, the groupings can make you a better candidate for a career. If you have a better background, then you will be more likely to be hired. To do this, try to get a minor that in some way supports your major. Getting a minor just because it sounds cool or unique may not help you in the long run such as a history major with a physical education minor.

Answered by: Jpeltz Q. | over 4 years ago
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Many schools don't require declaring a minor. But with the job scarcity today, it is a good idea to have at least two areas that you have good skills in, that is the purpose of a minor. So, find something you enjoy and will have a life long interest in other than your major and make that your minor.

Answered by: Anonymous J. | over 4 years ago
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It shows future employers that you have other interests and skills. Having a minor usually wont make an employer go crazy, but it is always nice to have. Even if it doesn't impress anyone, if it is something you are truly interested in, you will have a lot of fun with it. It doesn't necessarily need to be related to your major. If you end up not liking it, its only a couple classes anyway.

Answered by: Allgrowdup O. | over 4 years ago
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There are degree programs in which a minor defines what your field of study is. There are many business majors. The marketing minors will go into marketing. The accounting minors will go into accounting. Education majors with a math minor will be math teachers. The education majors with a minor in Spanish will be Spanish teachers.

Answered by: Tbw R. | over 4 years ago
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Minors give you more education in a certain area and may look good on a job resemae. It will make you appear as you have more knowledge and degree's. Your going to take classes anyway so be sure they fit into the list of credits needed for some minors, why not?

Answered by: Purple N. | over 4 years ago
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Some people do it because they finish their major early. Some people do it for fun. Some others are just overachievers. And some use it to supplement and help their major.

Answered by: Handy W. | over 4 years ago
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Some people declare minors because it is something that they enjoy studying and want to be recognized for it. Others choose minors to allow for opportunities to get into those areas later on. Minors are also useful if you want to specialize in an area of study that require more than one topic.

Answered by: Chaniel K. | over 4 years ago
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I know that declaring a major may seem pointless, but there are many reasons it can be beneficial in the long run. For one, you can gain more knowledge in your field. If you have a major in a language, you could minor in linguistics. These groupings can better your understanding of your personal interest. Furthermore, the groupings can make you a better candidate for a career. If you have a better background, then you will be more likely to be hired. To do this, try to get a minor that in some way supports your major. Getting a minor just because it sounds cool or unique may not help you in the long run such as a history major with a physical education minor.

Answered by: Jpeltz Q. | over 4 years ago
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Many schools don't require declaring a minor. But with the job scarcity today, it is a good idea to have at least two areas that you have good skills in, that is the purpose of a minor. So, find something you enjoy and will have a life long interest in other than your major and make that your minor.

Answered by: Anonymous J. | over 4 years ago
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It shows future employers that you have other interests and skills. Having a minor usually wont make an employer go crazy, but it is always nice to have. Even if it doesn't impress anyone, if it is something you are truly interested in, you will have a lot of fun with it. It doesn't necessarily need to be related to your major. If you end up not liking it, its only a couple classes anyway.

Answered by: Allgrowdup O. | over 4 years ago
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Minors give you more education in a certain area and may look good on a job resemae. It will make you appear as you have more knowledge and degree's. Your going to take classes anyway so be sure they fit into the list of credits needed for some minors, why not?

Answered by: Purple N. | over 4 years ago
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Some people do it because they finish their major early. Some people do it for fun. Some others are just overachievers. And some use it to supplement and help their major.

Answered by: Handy W. | over 4 years ago
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Declaring a minor and sticking with it can be useful in showing a future employer a further specialization past your major. This can give you a leg up on the competition for your future job. Additionally, adding a minor shows a hard-working and self-disciplined spirit, something employers are only too happy to find.

Answered by: Adamkendallz V. | over 4 years ago
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Some people declare minors because it is something that they enjoy studying and want to be recognized for it. Others choose minors to allow for opportunities to get into those areas later on. Minors are also useful if you want to specialize in an area of study that require more than one topic.

Answered by: Chaniel K. | over 4 years ago
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It can be pointless UNLESS you have a major that requires a minor. I majored in speech pathology and audiology which required a major so I had to choose one. Majors like nursing or engineering don't require a minor so it's not necessary to have one. Look at your major at what it requires, then decide from there. Some people choose to have a minor even if it's not required to make them more viable in the job force or simply because they are interested in that subject.

Answered by: Katat Ull O. | over 4 years ago
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It is true that you can take all the classes involved in a minor without declaring it, but why would you want to? If anything declaring a minor will help you. Depending on your major it can be a build up that will help you in the future or the start to another carrier that may help you down the line. If you are taking classes that already contribute towards a major it is definitely worth doing.

Answered by: Hirise5190 G. | over 4 years ago
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Students who choose to declare a minor take a number of institutionally required courses in the minor area of study. These courses will appear on your college transcript. Employers are often interested in college coursework, as well as the degree.

Answered by: Lou N. | over 4 years ago
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There are several reasons why you should declare a minor. First, a minor could enhance your career prospects. Having a minor gives you extra experience that companies may be interested in. Next, a minor can give you a leg up on graduate or professional school admission. Finally, a well-chosen minor can even assist and enhance enhance your performance in your major.

Answered by: Em Ugrad08 P. | over 4 years ago
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I had the same questions. I never thought that minors were really relevant and according to everything I have seen post graduation, they are really just there to appease people that want to have a little extra something to do. My best suggestion is t to just major in something that you find interesting and learn all here is to learn about it. Minors are very pointless, in my opionion.

Answered by: Ra Ncor202 C. | over 4 years ago
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You are able to get selective study during college, instead of a bunch of random classes. Also, some employers require certain types of majors to be completed in order to take you seriously. Think about it like this, would you want a doctor that did not know how to treat you because he did not study medicine for more then 1 or 2 classes? What about a lawyer to represent you that didn___t really know the law? What about your pc repairman, what if he only took 1 class on computers? Declaring a major is very important if you really want to pursue a certain career.

Answered by: Lgk E. | over 4 years ago
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Most schools do not require that you declare a minor in your studies. Many college graduates never declare a minor, so it is definitely not a necessity. A minor shows that you have a special expertise in a certain area of focus. It may help you get a job based on that special knowledge that you might have gained from your minor. Also, if you plan on getting an advanced degree, transferring schools, or changing majors, a minor may help you to get future credit for basic core requirements for other programs.

Answered by: Sarahsparks T. | over 4 years ago
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If you're going into a competitive field it can give you a slight advantage. It also can give you some more options when seeking employment, assuming the minor isn't basically the same thing as your major. For many people though, it's just a way to justify learning about something that interests them, but that they may not want to pursue as a career. College is a good time to broaden your horizons.

Answered by: Wennifred K. | over 4 years ago
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I don't think there is a point to doing this unless you are going to use it to get you a job. I don't think I've ever heard of an employer asking you what you minored in. I guess if you declared it, it would be your constant reminder that you almost got a degree in that, but I don't think that is a good thing.

Answered by: L Platter F. | over 4 years ago
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There are degree programs in which a minor defines what your field of study is. There are many business majors. The marketing minors will go into marketing. The accounting minors will go into accounting. Education majors with a math minor will be math teachers. The education majors with a minor in Spanish will be Spanish teachers.

Answered by: Tbw R. | over 4 years ago
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It lets others know an area that you are well educated in. This way when you have a job, you can be recognized based on other qualifications. This can lead to a promotion or leadership role. Make sure you major in something useable. This will increase your chances for a promotion.

Answered by: Average Joe V. | over 4 years ago
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